Friday Fictioneers: March 11, 2011


 

friday-fictioneersThanks to Rochelle Wisoff-Fields for her amazing commitment to Friday Fictioneers each week.  Visit her blog, Addicted to Purple, to join the fun and/or read the other stories. Fictioneers are encouraged to write a 100 word story, with a beginning, middle and end. Thank you to B. W. Beacham, for this week’s photo.  I love Janet Webb’s thoughtful new clip art of the “the Rules.”

I try to read most of the stories each week, and apologize if I’ve missed yours. I’ve been traveling for family happenings and have not been as able to keep all the balls in the air. I am grateful to everyone who stops by Tales From the Motherland; I always welcome constructive feedback.

© B.W. Beacham

© B.W. Beacham

(97 Words)

“The sea gives us food and sustains us, but it is not our friend.”

Isamu’s gaze was calm, as he held his daughter’s small hand.

“Your mother loved the sea…”

Aiko stood near the waves and laughed as the sand buried her feet.

“Did Okaasan love the sea more than us, Chichi?”

“Your mother loved you most of all, sweet girl.”

“Then why did she choose the sea?”

Aiko’s curious eyes searched her father’s sad face.

“The sea is not our friend. It is greedy and hungry… the sea chose your mother, she did not choose it.”

In remembrance of the estimated 18,000 people who lost their lives in the March 11, 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami–  יכול הזכרון שלהם להיות ברכה   May their memory be a blessing. This year was the third anniversary.

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About Dawn Quyle Landau

Mother, Writer, treasure hunter, aging red head, and sushi lover. This is my view on life, "Straight up, with a twist––" because life is too short to be subtle! Featured blogger for Huffington Post, and followed on Twitter by LeBron James– for reasons beyond my comprehension.
Aside | This entry was posted in Awareness, Blogging, blogs, Death, Flash fiction, Friday Fictioneers, Judaism, Life, Nature, News, Tales From the Motherland, Writing challenge and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

75 Responses to Friday Fictioneers: March 11, 2011

  1. mamaheidi60 says:

    I have always been in awe of the power of water! May there memory be a blessing – yes!

    Like

  2. susanissima says:

    Your tone is perfect here. Might it lead to a longer piece?

    Like

  3. Honie Briggs says:

    Love this. I have a young friend who lost her mother in the 2004 tsunami that hit Thailand. We visited the memorial together on Phi Phi Island in 2010. It was very moving to stand beside her as she memorialized her mother.

    Like

    • I can’t imagine, Honie. The sheer magnitude of those losses is staggering. As I wrote this, the 2004 tsunami was in my mind, as well, but as the anniversary to this event approaches, I opted to honor the Japan victims and survivors. That grocery cart in the photo, brought both to mind. Thanks for sharing.

      Like

  4. wmqcolby says:

    Well-fitting memorial tribute to those lost in the Tsunami. You captured the feelings and the metaphors spot on. Great!

    Like

  5. A lovely tribute; very thought provoking, very beautiful.

    Like

  6. Powerful reminder of how the things we love can sometimes turn on us and be our worst enemies. I can’t believe it’s been three years; I remember watching it on television and thinking “those people are dying before my eyes.”

    Like

    • Indeed; it was such a horrific time for Japan, as well as the world. I kept thinking about the 2004 SE Asia tsunami, as I wrote this… so hard to believe that THAT is 10 years ago! Sadly, time moves on and there is always another powerful story that rocks us. Thanks for your feedback, Perry.

      Like

  7. Like Perry my first thought was a powerful way to look at the sea and the destruction she afflicts upon us. Amazing dialog with the father and child.

    Like

  8. Dear Dawn,

    I skipped reading the other comments so if I repeat it’s not intentional. You’ve captured the child’s innocence and the father’s care and grief. Gently powerful. Like a fine watercolor, this is a work of art. To say more will only detract from the brilliance of it.

    Shalom,
    Rochelle

    Like

  9. I too can’t believe it is three years. A very moving piece.
    Claire

    Like

    • Thanks Claire… I think time passes quickly for those of us, out of harms way. It probably plays over and over for the victims… and the time drags along, waiting for life to return to “normal.” I appreciate your time and feedback, Claire.

      Like

  10. helenmidgley says:

    Dawn, that was a fabulously crafted piece of prose. so much woven into so few words, fab 🙂

    Like

  11. Dawn, a well wrought story about giving and taking away, a child’s wonder and the best explanation a father can give without showing extreme anger and hurt. Beautiful.

    Like

  12. I really thought it was suicide until your epilogue.

    Like

  13. You always seem to handle those difficult and emotional subjects with great sensitivity, Dawn. A moving homage to the people who remain as well as those who lost their lives. The tsunami hit on March 11, though.

    Like

  14. Dawn, A very touching piece and a fitting memorial to those people in Japan and people who have been caught up in any tragedy. Very well written as always.

    Like

  15. Mike Lince says:

    Just as the picture inspire your words, your writing evokes vivid mental images of the news footage of water spreading relentlessly across coastal towns and farmland. The devastation was so awful as to be surreal. Your story is a beautiful reminder and tribute to the loss of life and property that affected so many people. We need to be reminded how fragile and fleeting are our lives, and that we should make the most of every day. Granted, there are days when life sucks, but it still beats the alternative. – Mike

    Like

  16. BRAVO. WELL REMEMBERED AND BEAUTIFULLY PENNED. Apols for caps. Too lazy to change.

    Like

    • HMM, SEEMS YOU did… change… the caps. But I’m so glad you had the first part in caps, and not the last part! Thanks Patrick. Your time and feedback are much appreciated… not to mention your wonderful humor. Well, that too, as I have indeed mentioned it.

      Like

  17. Teak Sherman says:

    Very nice Dawn.

    Like

  18. Mike says:

    Your story this week is very strong. It grabbed my heart. Had to look up the translation of the Hebrew words — and I was moved. Excellent writing.

    Like

    • Welcome to Tales From the Motherland! Thanks so much, Mike. I put the translation in italics, right after the Hebrew. I hoped folks would realize this, but touched that you took the time to look it up. I appreciate your time and kind feedback.

      Like

  19. R. E. Hunter says:

    Very touching. I grew up near the ocean, so I’ve seen a bit of what it can do. Atlantic, so no tsunamis, but storm surges and big waves can be devastating too.

    Like

    • I grew up south of Boston, and learned at a young age that the ocean can indeed be a fickle friend! I never stand beside it and not appreciate both its beauty and its potential for disaster. Thanks so much for making the time, R.E.; it’s much appreciated!

      Like

  20. Katalina4 says:

    “The sea is not our friend” – indeed. Reminds me of visiting Newfoundland friends and being shown “Widow’s peak”, the lookout point where fisherman’s wives would stand to watch for husband’s boats that might never come home…how the stats say fishing is more lethal than coal-mining… A powerful, powerful force, the sea.
    A beautifully crafted, touching piece, Dawn – thanks so much.
    Kat

    Like

    • Thank YOU, Kat. I always appreciate your feedback! Thanks for making the time. Many of the old homes in New England, have Widows Walks… same idea, but at the top of homes. So wives could watch for their husband’s ships. Eery. 🙂

      Like

  21. It shows well how cruel & impersonal the sea is

    Like

    • Indeed. We tend to humanize so many things… when the sea, is just that: the sea. It doesn’t care if we are poor, rich, compassionate, a friend or foe… it’s not personal. Thanks for taking the time, Larry.

      Like

  22. liz young says:

    The poor man, and so sad thathis daughter thinks her mother might have chosen to leave them

    Like

  23. So sad.. and Tsunami brings such strong memories.. Japan, and of course the one in 2004.. I know people that were in Thailand then.. a former colleague of mine lost her parents and her sister to the water… she, her brother-in-law and her two nieces got home again…

    Like

    • Wow, Björn, what an enormous loss! I had friends there at the time too. They all got out, but it was harrowing, at the least. I can’t imagine anything much more terrifying than a tsunami… I am dying to go to SE Asia, but it definitely changed my fantasies of the place.

      Thanks for taking the time for my post. I always appreciate your thoughts.

      Like

  24. Lucy says:

    So many lost. What a shame. Great story. Lucy

    Like

  25. unfetteredbs says:

    You packed a lot of depth and emotion is so few words. Somber remembrance. Well done.

    Like

  26. subroto says:

    This was indeed a moving story of loss and remembrance. A brief reminder of how life can change in an instance and no matter much we progress we are still at the mercy of nature.

    Like

  27. Sandra says:

    Very nicely done. A poignant tale.

    Like

  28. rgayer55 says:

    Tales like this make those tragedies personal. You watch on TV and it breaks your heart to see the pain and suffering of those whose loved ones were swept away, but when names and faces are added the anguish becomes much more real. Well done, Dawn.

    Like

  29. etomczyk says:

    Sorry I haven’t been around in a while–been traveling quite a bit. I love this story. It reads like poetry. It’s so touching.

    Hope you’re feeling better. (I kept my promise.) 🙂

    Like

    • Thank E… I haven’t been around much either. You’ve missed a few key posts, but suffice it to say, there’s been a lot of recovery and lying around… unable to focus or keep up! I’m just getting back into the swing and trying to catch up with posts. I wish more of the blogs I read were Friday Fictioneers… 100 words would make it much easier! 😉 Thanks for taking the time check out this post, and I hope the travel has at least been fun! Happy Mother’s Day!

      Like

  30. Unfortunately, I did read the other comments before writing, leaving me with not much to say that wouldn’t have already been expressed more eloquently. Nature can be lovely and loving; also heartless and killing. Even in life, what we love can turn on us. Sadly ironic that the anniversary is on Mother’s Day this year.

    janet

    Like

    • The anniversary is actually MARCH 11, Janet. I had it wrong initially and corrected it… A good catch by Karen! That said, I don’t think there is any time when we should not be compelled to stop and remember. Thanks for taking the time… I know you’ve been busy! Happy Mother’s Day 😀

      Like

  31. Amy Reese says:

    This is a powerful piece, Dawn. I’ll never forget that terrible event of that tsunami,so shocking. I especially like your ending here how the sea chose her. Nice work, Dawn!

    Like

  32. Shandra says:

    Beautiful, poignant Tribute.So tender & touching. Inviting you to see my #FridayFictioneers post. Feedback very Welcome!

    Like

    • Shandra, thank you so much for your kind feedback. I really appreciate your time, and energy. Yes, of course; I’d be happy to read yours! I used to read them all, but with nearly 100 a week now, I read as many as I can. Headed over there now. 😉 Again, thanks for stopping by!

      Like

  33. Bastet says:

    This is a wonderful tribute to so many who lost their lives to the Tsunami. I loved the dialogue between the father and his child. The sea was indeed greedy that day.

    Like

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