Friday Fictioneers: May This Boat Hold Our Dreams…


friday-fictioneersOnce again, I forgot to link up! Someday, I’ll get this right.

A belated tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr and his Dream– one day, may it truly be real, for all of us. Until then, black mothers and fathers will bury their children, and no doubt question the “progress” that so many others see. Until we are all free, none of us are. To the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr– who stood by his dream until the end.

Friday Fictioneers is a highly addictive, weekly flash fiction challenge. Photo prompt, 100 words or less, and take the time to read the other stories. I apologize that I was unable to read as many as usual last week; I was out of town and away from my computer. Check our Rochelle Wisoff-Fields’ blog, Addicted to Purple, to join in or read more. Thanks to Georgia Koch for this week’s photo.

As always, I welcome honest and constructive feedback; please leave a comment.

© Georgia Koch

© Georgia Koch

 May This Boat Hold Our Dreams (99 words)

We will bury this child, and say his name as a memory. We will hold his life in our hearts, but not forget his death.

We will continue to dream.

We will teach our sons to walk proud, but to always be vigilant– until the day comes when we can all rest, peacefully.

We will stand at the water’s edge and cast our sorrows out, in a rotten boat that still floats steady, on stormy seas, and carries our dreams and hopes.

And as the waves kiss the shore, we pray they bring the freedom we still dream of.

© Johnny Nguyen

© Johnny Nguyen

*     *     *

GIPYHelp Me Reach My Goals! I’d love to see the Tales From the Motherland Facebook page reach 700 likes in 2015. Have you stopped by to spread some fairy dust? Follow me on Twitter, it’s where I’m forced to be brief. Most importantly, if you like a post I’ve written, hit Like and leave a comment. I love to hear what readers think. Honest, positive or constructive feedback is always welcome. Click Follow; you’ll get each new post delivered by email, with no spam.  If you see ads on this page, please let me know. They shouldn’t be there.  ©2014  Please note, that all content and images on this site are copyrighted to Dawn Quyle Landau and Tales From the Motherland, unless specifically noted otherwise. If you want to share my work, please give proper credit. Plagiarism sucks.

 

About Dawn Quyle Landau

Mother, Writer, treasure hunter, aging red head, and sushi lover. This is my view on life, "Straight up, with a twist––" because life is too short to be subtle! Featured blogger for Huffington Post, and followed on Twitter by LeBron James– for reasons beyond my comprehension.
Aside | This entry was posted in Awareness, Blog, Blogging, Courage, Death, Friday Fictioneers, Life, My world, Tales From the Motherland, Writing and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

56 Responses to Friday Fictioneers: May This Boat Hold Our Dreams…

  1. Mike Lince says:

    I love how your moving tribute cleverly links the image of the aging boat to the lasting message and legacy of one of the great leaders of our time. Your words are inspiring as were the words of the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Your talent continues to grow and impress. Well done. – Mike

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Amy Reese says:

    A really hopeful message here, Dawn. Nice one!

    Like

  3. susanissima says:

    Thoughtful and fitting.

    Like

  4. etomczyk says:

    This was very nice, Dawn. I love the photo of the policeman and the young boy. It has become one of my favorite in recent months. Let us all continue to strive to live the dream.

    Like

  5. I love how you used the prompt. Simply beautiful and hopeful.

    Chris

    Like

    • Thanks, Chris. I suppose I’m on a hopeful bender lately… that said, I must admit to some sincere hopeless feelings about race relations in this country. While I have always wanted to believe in Dr King’s dream, the older I get the more discouraged I feel… as the news continues to bring home the fact that young black men are really struggling. Thanks for your thoughtful comment; it’s much appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. We will stand at the water’s edge and cast our sorrows out, in a rotten boat that still floats steady, on stormy seas, and carries our dreams and hopes.

    This entire piece touches on so much that is still twisted in our world but I have copied and pasted my favorite line. Cheers, dear, wonderful submission.

    Like

  7. storydivamg says:

    Dear Dawn,
    Three of my precious nieces are bi-racial, and I worry often about them. I am teaching the four-year-old preschool this winter, and I am torn about how to instruct her concerning safety. I know that as a child she will likely be safe asking for assistance from police officers, but I worry whether or not that will be the case when she is older. Do I instruct her as my white mother instructed me: “Police officers are your friends.” Or do I tell her to trust them only when they can see her hands? For the moment, I’m sticking to the ABCs and 123s. At night, I cry myself to sleep over recent events in Ferguson, so near where my own mother began her career in law enforcement.

    Thanks for writing about this difficult topic.

    All my best,
    Marie Gail

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marie Gail, what a powerful and uniquely personal response. I hope that for all our sakes, we can find a way to truly embrace each other and support one another. I hope this for your niece, and for all the children who deserve to dream big and expect that they might see those dreams come true… xo

      Like

  8. wildbilbo says:

    Lovely writing, a great homage

    Like

  9. Sandra says:

    A very fitting reminder, Dawn. Well done.

    Like

  10. dmmacilroy says:

    Dear Dawn,

    Hope floats.

    And your story carries all of our hope with it. Well done.

    Aloha,

    Doug

    Like

  11. Dear Dawn,

    Little known fact. I was once the token white Jewish girl in a black Pentecostal church. Very moving piece. May peace happen and happen soon. Amen.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  12. It is hard to dream of better days when our present is so bleak. But even when all the hope is gone, we shouldn’t give up on our dreams. A very touching tribute, I love it.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. The use of the “dream” motif works really well for signifying Dr. King and his legacy unto the present. An incredible amount of work has been done for those who remember the 50’s and early 60’s, but there’s still a good bit more to do.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. elmowrites says:

    Lovely, moving piece. I can’t imagine the pain of losing a child, or of living in a world where prejudice is such a danger. As women, we face prejudice and challenges sometimes, but in general, they are not of the kind faced by minorities in a society that continues to see murders over the colour of skin or the creed of one’s heart.

    Liked by 1 person

    • So very true, Jennifer. As women, and mothers, I think we do know a piece of this… but agreed, not the enormous burden of seeking equality for your child, when your skin is black, or brown… or, not white. May we never know the pain of losing a child, but always work to bring change.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Touching prose, Dawn and a timely message which I fear may be destined to become timeless.

    Like

  16. plaridel says:

    these words can move mountains. well done.

    Like

  17. draliman says:

    A very moving piece, and I love your link to the prompt photo through “a rotten boat that still floats steady”.

    Like

  18. helenmidgley says:

    Absolutely beautiful 🙂

    Like

  19. Lovely writing, very emotive.

    Like

  20. I cannot cease to wonder why the color of skin would matter so much… it just amaze me… this reads like poetry to me.

    Like

    • I feel the very same way, Björn. It really troubles me deeply. As a young child, I felt so certain that it would change, and we’d all know equality. As I get older, that vision is harder to believe in. I felt like I was writing a poem of sorts; thanks for noticing. 😉

      Like

  21. Margaret says:

    Your story is most moving, and can apply to all of us: is there a place in the world that is free from senseless bigotry and cruelty? It seems that some human beings have a driving need to hate. Why is that?

    Like

  22. Nan Falkner says:

    Dear Dawn, Great story. I also feel sorry for the plight of the black population. I have a son that is a policeman who is very lucky to be alive because a criminal decided to hold him onto the car as he drove down the street. My son is ok, but they put their lives in danger everyday they go to work. How many people in the world do that. I do think that there are “stinkers” out there that ruin the good name of the police and that makes me sick. If the police can’t be empathetic then they should choose another profession, but it criminals are going to try to kill people, steal and drag them down the street tearing flesh from their body, then they should be punished accordingly. Nan 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m thankful for what what the police and fire dept do, every day, and I agree with Jon Stewart: “You can have great regard for law enforcement and still want them held to high standard.” They put their lives on the line every day, and I really respect that. I’m so glad your son is safe, Nan.

      Like

  23. Cathy Ulrich says:

    I’m very late getting here, Dawn, but I always save your posts to read when I get the time. Your beautiful tribute shares a dream that is yet to be realized. And we can hold out the hope that it will someday.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Great use of the prompt to fit it to Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Dawn. It’s sad we can’t get things right after all these years. Well done/ 🙂 — Suzanne

    Like

  25. Dee says:

    We must never stop dreaming of better times and we must believe that they will happen. I remember the film ‘The Long Walk Home’ I saw it years ago, on a plane on my way to the USA. This powerful tale of actual events has stayed with me. I cannot imagine what it must be like to be marginalised because of the colour of my skin or my religion.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Having raised 3 Jewish children, I have experienced the religion end of that, Dee, but that is not transparent to everyone. A person can’t change their skin color or hide it. They shouldn’t have to. But what an incredibly oppressive way to live. Thanks for taking the time to read and comment on my story, Dee; it’s much appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. rgayer55 says:

    Everything worthy starts with hope and a dream. The rotten boat that still floats makes a great metaphor for the challenges those hopes and dreams face on the stormy seas of life. A very timely, and fitting tribute to Dr. King. Well done, Dawn.

    Like

  27. subroto says:

    Full of hope and very moving.

    Like

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