Friday Fictioneers: Lost In the Music


friday-fictioneersEach week, writers from all over the world join in the 100-word flash fiction challenge, that is Friday Fictioneers. Rochelle Wisoff-Fields herds this collection of kool kats, and this week, David Stewart provided the photo. If you’d like to join in, or read the other stories, check out Rochelle’s blog: Addicted to Purple. Warning: Friday Fictioneers is highly addictive!

In my usual goofball state, I forgot to post this when written…  As always, I welcome positive or constructive feedback. Please leave a comment and tell me what you think.

© David Stewart

© David Stewart

 Lost In the Music (100 words, exactly)

“Come on Betts, darling, try a bite of this; it’s your favorite.”

Frank studied her dreamy blue eyes and waited for his wife of sixty-two years. 

“Honey, Suze made this especially for you. Remember how much you loved to pick berries each summer in Kennebunk? Of course I’d never say it to her, but our girl’s piecrust can’t hold a candle to yours… Still, she baked it with love.”

Their song came on the sound system and Betty smiled.

“I love this song, it reminds me… Tell me again, who are you? It’s so kind of you to visit me.”

*     *     *

GIPYHelp Me Reach My Goals! I’d love to see the Tales From the Motherland Facebook page reach 700 likes in 2015. Have you stopped by to spread some fairy dust? Follow me on Twitter, where I’m forced to be brief. Most importantly, if you like a post I’ve written, hit Like and leave a comment. I love to hear what readers think. Honest, positive or constructive feedback is always welcome. Click Follow; you’ll get each new post delivered by email, with no spam.  If you see ads on this page, please let me know. They shouldn’t be there.  ©2014  Please note, that all content and images on this site are copyrighted to Dawn Quyle Landau and Tales From the Motherland, unless specifically noted otherwise. If you want to share my work, please give proper credit. Plagiarism sucks.

About Dawn Quyle Landau

Mother, Writer, treasure hunter, aging red head, and sushi lover. This is my view on life, "Straight up, with a twist––" because life is too short to be subtle! Featured blogger for Huffington Post, and followed on Twitter by LeBron James– for reasons beyond my comprehension.
Aside | This entry was posted in Aging, Blog, Fiction, Flash fiction, Friday Fictioneers, Life, Love, Memories, Music, Relationships, Tales From the Motherland, Writing and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

66 Responses to Friday Fictioneers: Lost In the Music

  1. This is so sweet and yet so sad and written beautifully!

    Like

  2. jgroeber says:

    That is exactly what I was thinking as soon as I saw the photo prompt. Something about the wafting music of a band in a park, sure to reawaken even the most distant and lost memories. Beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Great minds… that and the fact that you, me and Jen (Jenny’s Lark) are sisters from another mother. 😉 I saw the photo yesterday and knew where I’d go; I just had to find the time to go there. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Jen.

      Like

  3. El Guapo says:

    That is both beautiful and painful.
    Thank you for letting me read this.

    Like

  4. wildbilbo says:

    Sad, poignant, well told.
    Nicely done.
    KT

    Like

  5. Carrie Rubin says:

    So touching but also heartbreaking. Well done.

    Like

  6. micklively says:

    Very sad but beautifully crafted.

    Like

  7. Dee says:

    Great job highlighting the different layers of dementia. I’ve written a few stories about this desperately sad illness over the years, it is such a huge burden caring for someone suffering it and so sad as you watch the vibrant person you knew disappear before your eyes.
    Well done Dawn.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. A beautiful, heartfelt piece,brought a tear to my eyes.

    Like

  9. rgayer55 says:

    I used to go to the nursing home once or twice a week when Mom was there. There was a man who came every day and spent hours with this wife. She didn’t have a clue who he was, or sometimes that he was even there, but it didn’t dissuade him from coming. I was in awe of a love that strong.

    Liked by 1 person

    • My neighbor does the same for her husband… but I also know that it’s truly breaking her heart. He really doesn’t know her at all anymore. Such a devastating way to end those years together. Thanks for sharing, Russell.

      Like

  10. So many of us are dealing with this we can relate to this story. Thanks for making it heartwarming. It’s not always that way.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Cathy Ulrich says:

    So sad and sweet, Dawn. You captured the feelings so well in this short piece.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. “I love this song, it reminds me… Tell me again, who are you? It’s so kind of you to visit me.” ❤

    My grandpa (mom's side) and grandma (dad's side) have dementia, so this hits very close to home. To be able to see all of someone (who they are) and to be able to remember who they are to you are two precious things. I tried not to cry in front of my grandpa when I last visited him, but I couldn't help it. He helped wipe my tears away, but he couldn't understand why I was sad (especially when I saw glimpses of his "old" self). Thanks for sharing this great piece and touching our hearts.

    Like

  13. Shivangi says:

    poignant and heart breaking….kudos.

    Like

  14. Dawn, this is so dear. The love the couple shared/shares shines through, even though one half is “missing”. Nicely done. Alicia

    Like

  15. AnnIsikArts says:

    Dementia seems to be reaching epidemic proportions and it is truly awful. It’s even worse if the sufferer has no family. The recent discoveries of cruelty to the aged in homes – especially victims of this disease – have enraged me. At least ‘they’ are putting some money into research now. I hope I die in my sleep, like Picasso. Sorry you went through this with your mother.

    Like

    • Thanks so much for your thoughtful comment. I agree, these isolated stories of abuse (there are many, but still not common) are especially horrifying, in that it seem sos wrong that someone should read as certain age and be treated that way. And yes, in my sleep would be perfect… preferably at a ripe old age! 😉

      Like

  16. I hate Alzheimer’s.
    Still – a nice story.

    Like

  17. afairymind says:

    Beautifully sad. Well done. 🙂

    Like

  18. Bitter sweet and nicely told.
    Tracey

    Like

  19. Lovely story, Dawn. We went through it with my mother who had Alzheimer’s. I think she knew we were family, but that was about it. She enjoyed our visits though, and they took good care of her at the nursing home. Well done as always.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Jan Brown says:

    Beautiful story. It’s so hard to watch someone slip away right before your eyes. The taste of the pie… The sound of the music…are triggers that could bring her back to him, if only for a moment.

    Like

  21. erinleary says:

    Heartbreakingly lovely. Reminds of so many visits with my grandma after dementia set in. So difficult for all.

    Like

  22. Perfectly portrayed but painfully sad.
    AnElephant weeps.

    Like

  23. Oh this made me sad, yet they are trying their best to break through those sad barriers of dementia.

    Like

    • I think at a certain point, those dealing with dementia know that they must just accept it. We are drawn to connect, even when we know the connections have faded. Sad, indeed, but I appreciate you taking the time to read and comment.

      Like

  24. dmmacilroy says:

    Dear Dawn,

    A sweet, sad song, isn’t it. Life is hard sometimes. Well done.

    Aloha,

    Doug

    Like

  25. Dear Dawn,

    It’s heartbreaking to see a loved one slip away in that way. Death is kinder. Sweetly written.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Like

  26. Nan Falkner says:

    Dear Dawn, Wonderful and poignant story! Just perfect! Nan

    Like

  27. Dawn, this is right on so many levels, although sad too. They say music can cut through dementia.

    Like

    • I’ve read some very interesting articles about music and dementia, and while I didn’t see it, I know there was a documentary about just that, fairly recently.

      Thanks for your kind feedback, Dave; it’s much appreciated.

      Like

  28. Margaret says:

    Your descriptive details are beautiful – her eyes, the berries, the pie crust, the song. They make the scene come alive. So sad.

    Like

  29. Dawn, this manages to be both beautiful and heartbreaking at the same time. Beautiful in his love and dedication and heartbreaking because only one of them still remembers. I love that the music reaches her and makes sense to her in a way that her surroundings cannot.

    Like

  30. The sadness of aging brought into a beautiful colorful story of a special moment. 😎

    Like

  31. Sad, but filled with love. What more can we do, right? Beautiful as ever, Dawn.

    Like

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